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Wood Engraving-Trip Around the Block

Wood Engraving-Trip Around the Block

BAG Lecture

November 3, 2016 | 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

 

the Book Arts Guild and University of Washington Libraries present
Wood Engraving: a Trip around the Block
with Will Davis
Thursday November 3, 2016 7-9pm (doors open at 6:45)
Maps/Special Collections classroom B069  Suzzallo Library, University of Washington
In this lecture and slide show, we’ll explore the techniques and fascinating history of wood engraving.  Learn the highs and lows of this relief printmaking process, why it became such an important method for reproducing book illustrations in the 18th and 19th centuries, and how it has evolved since then.
The answers to all these questions (and many more) will be revealed!:
What do your front hedge and wood engraving have in common?
How did wood engraving inspire the Beatles’ song “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite?”
How do wood engravings, woodcut prints, and metal engravings differ?
What is a spitsticker?  (Hint: NOT the champion of a spitting contest.)
Why does the name “Dalziel” mysteriously lurk in the illustrations to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland?
Who was Thomas Bewick, why is he considered by many to be the “Father of Wood Engraving,” and why are both a wren and a swan named after him?
Will Davis majored in fine arts in college and pursued graduate studies in art history at Temple University.  He has a long-standing interest in printmaking techniques of all varieties.  He bought his first set of wood engraving tools only a few years ago, and he inaugurated them by cutting the lettering for his wedding invitation.  He works in the acquisitions department of the University of Washington Libraries, where he handles many books every day and, occasionally, ones illustrated with wood engravings.

Wood Engraving: a Trip around the Block

with Will Davis

In this lecture and slide show, we’ll explore the techniques and fascinating history of wood engraving. Learn the highs and lows of this relief printmaking process, why it became such an important method for reproducing book illustrations in the 18th and 19th centuries, and how it has evolved since then.

The answers to all these questions (and many more) will be revealed!:

Will Davis majored in fine arts in college and pursued graduate studies in art history at Temple University. He has a long-standing interest in printmaking techniques of all varieties.  He bought his first set of wood engraving tools only a few years ago, and he inaugurated them by cutting the lettering for his wedding invitation.  He works in the acquisitions department of the University of Washington Libraries, where he handles many books every day and, occasionally, ones illustrated with wood engravings.

 

 

 

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Other Images

Gwen Raverat illustration Sir John Tenniel illustration